Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Ophthalmol. 2016 Nov;171:101-112. doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2016.08.035. Epub 2016 Sep 2.

Quantifying Retinal Microvascular Changes in Uveitis Using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, USC Roski Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.
2
Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
3
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
4
Department of Ophthalmology, USC Roski Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: ahkashan@usc.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To quantify retinal capillary density and morphology in uveitis using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography angiography (SD-OCTA).

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional, observational study.

METHODS:

Healthy and uveitic subjects were recruited from 2 tertiary care eye centers. Prototype SD-OCTA devices (Cirrus; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc, Dublin, California, USA) were used to generate 3 × 3-mm2 OCTA images centered on the fovea. Subjects were placed into 3 groups based on the type of optical microangiography (OMAG) algorithm used for image processing (intensity and/or phase) and type of retinal segmentation (automatic or manual). A semi-automated method was used to calculate skeleton density (SD), vessel density (VD), fractal dimension (FD), and vessel diameter index (VDI). Retinal vasculature was assessed in the superficial retinal layer (SRL), deep retinal layer (DRL), and nonsegmented retinal layer (NS-RL). A generalized estimating equations model was used to analyze associations between the OCTA measures and disease status within each retinal layer. A P value < .05 was accepted as significant. Reproducibility and repeatability were assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC).

RESULTS:

The SD, VD, and FD of the parafoveal capillaries were lower in uveitic eyes compared with healthy eyes in all retinal segments. In addition, SD and VD were significantly lower in the DRL of subjects with uveitic macular edema. There was no correlation in any capillary parameters and anatomic classification of uveitis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Quantitative analysis of parafoveal capillary density and morphology in uveitis demonstrates significantly lower capillary density and complexity. SD-OCTA algorithms are robust enough to detect these changes and can provide a novel diagnostic index of disease for uveitis subjects.

PMID:
27594138
PMCID:
PMC5115969
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2016.08.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center