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Environ Pollut. 2016 Nov;218:1089-1093. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2016.08.061. Epub 2016 Sep 1.

Assessment of the developmental and neurotoxicity of the mosquito control larvicide, pyriproxyfen, using embryonic zebrafish.

Author information

  • 1Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, The Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory, and the Environmental Health Sciences Center at Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA. Electronic address: Lisa.truong@oregonstate.edu.
  • 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, The Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory, and the Environmental Health Sciences Center at Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA. Electronic address: Gman@oregonstate.edu.
  • 3Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, The Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory, and the Environmental Health Sciences Center at Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA. Electronic address: mtsimonich@oregonstate.edu.
  • 4Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, The Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory, and the Environmental Health Sciences Center at Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA. Electronic address: Robert.tanguay@oregonstate.edu.

Abstract

In 2014, as an attempt to address the Zika health crisis by controlling the mosquito population, Brazil took the unprecedented action of applying a chemical larvicide, pyriproxyfen, to drinking water sources. The World Health Organization has established an acceptable daily intake of pyriproxyfen to be 100 μg per kg of body weight per day, but studies have demonstrated that at elevated doses (>5000 mg/kg), there are adverse effects in mice, rats and dogs. To better understand the potential developmental toxicity of pyriproxyfen, we utilized the embryonic zebrafish. Our results demonstrate that the concentration resulting in 50% of animals presenting adverse morphological effects (EC50), including craniofacial defects, was 5.2 μM for daily renewal exposure, and above this concentration, adverse behavioral effects were also observed in animals that followed a static exposure regimen. Thus, zebrafish data suggest that the developmental toxicity of pyriproxyfen may not be limited to insects.

KEYWORDS:

Behavior; Development; Morphology defects; Neurotoxicology; Pyriproxyfen; Zebrafish; Zika

PMID:
27593350
PMCID:
PMC5048575
[Available on 2017-11-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2016.08.061
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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