Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Paediatr Child Health. 2017 Jan;53(1):47-54. doi: 10.1111/jpc.13313. Epub 2016 Sep 4.

Influenza vaccine efficacy in young children attending childcare: A randomised controlled trial.

Author information

1
National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
2
Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
3
School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
4
UQ Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
5
Queensland Paediatric Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, Children's Health Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
6
Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
7
Department of Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
8
Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
9
Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

AIM:

Influenza causes a substantial burden in young children. Vaccine efficacy (VE) data are limited in this age group. We examined trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) efficacy and safety in young children attending childcare.

METHODS:

A double-blind, randomised controlled trial in children aged 6 to <48 months was conducted with recruitment from Sydney childcare centres in 2011. Children were randomised to receive two doses of TIV or control hepatitis A vaccine. Efficacy was evaluated against polymerase chain reaction-confirmed influenza using parent-collected nose/throat swabs during influenza-like-illness. Safety outcomes were assessed during 6 months of follow-up.

RESULTS:

Fifty-seven children were allocated to influenza vaccine and 67 to control; all completed the study. The influenza attack rate was 1.8 vs 13.4% in the TIV and control groups, respectively; VE 87% (95%CI: 0-98%). For children aged 24 to <48 months, 0 vs 8 (18.6%) influenza infections occurred in the TIV and control groups respectively, giving a VE of 100% (16-100%). Efficacy was not shown in children 6 to <24 months, probably due to insufficient power. Injection site and systemic adverse events were mostly mild to moderate with no significant differences, apart from more mild diarrhoea following dose 2 in TIV recipients (11.8 vs 0%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Influenza vaccine appeared efficacious in the subgroup of children aged 24 to <48 months, although caution is required due to the small number of participants. There were no serious adverse events and most parents would vaccinate again. Influenza vaccination in a childcare setting could be valuable and a larger confirmatory study would be helpful.

KEYWORDS:

childcare; children; influenza; randomised controlled trial; vaccination

PMID:
27592696
DOI:
10.1111/jpc.13313
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center