Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Brain Behav Immun. 2017 Jan;59:147-157. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2016.08.019. Epub 2016 Aug 31.

The protective effects of resveratrol on social stress-induced cytokine release and depressive-like behavior.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Neuroscience, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, USA.
2
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, USA.
3
Department of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Neuroscience, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, USA. Electronic address: Susan.Wood@uscmed.sc.edu.

Abstract

Social stress is a risk factor for psychiatric disorders, however only a subset of the population is susceptible while others remain resilient. Inflammation has been linked to the pathogenesis of psychosocial disorders in humans and may underlie these individual differences. Using a resident-intruder paradigm capable of revealing individual differences in coping behavior and inflammatory responses, the present study determined if resveratrol (RSV; 0, 10, 30mg/kg/day) protected against persistent stress-induced inflammation in socially defeated rats. Furthermore, the antidepressant efficacy of RSV was evaluated using the sucrose preference test. Active coping rats were characterized by more time spent in upright postures and increased defeat latencies versus passive coping rats. Five days after defeat, flow cytometry revealed enhanced stimulation of proinflammatory proteins (IL-β, TNF-α) in spleen cells of passive rats as compared to active coping and controls, an effect that was blocked by both doses of RSV. Furthermore, only passive coping rats exhibited increased proinflammatory proteins (IL-1β, TNF-α, GM-CSF) in the locus coeruleus (LC), a noradrenergic brain region implicated in depression. Notably, only 30mg/kg RSV blocked LC neuroinflammation and importantly, was the only dose that blocked anhedonia. Alternatively, while stress had minimal impact on resting cytokines in the dorsal raphe (DR), RSV dose-dependently reduced DR cytokine expression. However, this did not result in changes in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity or serotonin levels. Taken together, these data suggest that social stress-induced depressive-like behavior evident in passive coping rats may be driven by stress-induced neuroinflammation and highlight natural anti-inflammatory agents to protect against social stress-related consequences.

KEYWORDS:

Coping; Depression; Inflammation; Resveratrol; Social stress

PMID:
27592314
PMCID:
PMC5154920
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbi.2016.08.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center