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Cell Stress Chaperones. 2016 Nov;21(6):1005-1019. Epub 2016 Sep 2.

A typical RNA-binding protein gene (AccRBM11) in Apis cerana cerana: characterization of AccRBM11 and its possible involvement in development and stress responses.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, College of Life Sciences, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong, 271018, People's Republic of China.
2
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong, 271018, People's Republic of China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, College of Life Sciences, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong, 271018, People's Republic of China. qhsun@sdau.edu.cn.
4
College of Animal Science and Technology, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong, 271018, People's Republic of China. bhxu@sdau.edu.cn.

Abstract

RNA-binding motif proteins (RBMs) belong to RNA-binding proteins that display extraordinary posttranscriptional gene regulation roles in various cellular processes, including development, growth, and stress responses. Nevertheless, only a few examples of the roles of RBMs are known in insects, particularly in Apis cerana cerana. In the present study, we characterized the novel RNA-binding motif protein 11 from Apis cerana cerana, which was named AccRBM11 and whose promoter sequence included abundant potential transcription factor binding sites that are connected to responses to adverse stress and early development. Quantitative PCR results suggested that AccRBM11 was expressed at highest levels in 1-day postemergence worker bees. AccRBM11 mRNA and protein levels were higher in the poison gland and the epidermis than in other tissues. Moreover, levels of AccRBM11 transcription were upregulated upon all the simulation of abiotic stresses. Furthermore, Western blot analysis indicated that AccRBM11 protein expression levels could be induced under some abiotic stressors, a result that did not completely in agree with the qRT-PCR results. It is also noteworthy that the expression of some genes that connected with development or stress responses were remarkably suppressed when AccRBM11 was silenced, which suggested that AccRBM11 might play a similar role in development or stress reactions with the above genes. Taken together, the data presented here provide evidence that AccRBM11 is potentially involved in the regulation of development and some abiotic stress responses. We expect that this study will promote future research on the function of RNA-binding proteins.

KEYWORDS:

Abiotic stresses; Apis cerana cerana; Expression patterns; RNA-binding protein

PMID:
27590229
PMCID:
PMC5083670
DOI:
10.1007/s12192-016-0725-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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