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Korean J Pediatr. 2016 Jul;59(7):303-7. doi: 10.3345/kjp.2016.59.7.303. Epub 2016 Jul 31.

Dietary habits and gastroesophageal reflux disease in preschool children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Bundang CHA Medical Center, CHA University School of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To identify the relationship between dietary habits and childhood gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in preschool children.

METHODS:

We performed a questionnaire study to analyze the relationship between dietary habits and GERD in 85 preschool children with GERD and 117 healthy children of the same age.

RESULTS:

Irregular and picky eating were more p-revalent in the GERD group than in the control group (odds ratio [OR], 4.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37-12.54 and OR, 4.96; 95% CI, 1.88-13.14, respectively). The snack preferences and the late night eating habits were significantly more prevalent in the GERD group than in the control group (OR, 3.83; 95% CI, 1.23-11.87 and OR, 9.51; 95% CI, 2.55-35.49, respectively). A preference for liquid foods was significantly more prevalent in the GERD group (OR, 9.51; 95% CI, 2.548-35.485). The dinner-to-bedtime interval was significantly shorter in the GERD group than in the control group (157.06±48.47 vs. 174.62±55.10, P=0.020). In addition, the time between dinner and bedtime was shorter than 3 hours in 47 children (55.3%) of the GERD group and 44 (37.6%) of the control group. This difference was statistical significance (P=0.015).

CONCLUSION:

Dietary habits such as picky and irregular eating, snack preference, a preference of liquid foods, late night eating, and a shorter dinner-to-bedtime interval had a significant correlation with GERD. Further large-scale studies are necessary to confirm our results.

KEYWORDS:

Child; Dietary habits; Gatroesophageal reflux; Preschool child

Conflict of interest statement

No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

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