Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Dent Educ. 2016 Sep;80(9):1071-81.

Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

Author information

1
Ms. Pervez is a dental student, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan; Prof. Kinney is Associate Professor of Dentistry and Director of Dental Hygiene Program, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan; Prof. Gwozdek is Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of Dental Hygiene Graduate and Degree Completion Programs, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan; Ms. Farrell is Oral Health Program Director, Michigan Department of Community Health and Adjunct Clinical Lecturer, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan; and Dr. Inglehart is Professor, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry and Adjunct Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Literature, Science, and Arts, University of Michigan.
2
Ms. Pervez is a dental student, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan; Prof. Kinney is Associate Professor of Dentistry and Director of Dental Hygiene Program, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan; Prof. Gwozdek is Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of Dental Hygiene Graduate and Degree Completion Programs, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan; Ms. Farrell is Oral Health Program Director, Michigan Department of Community Health and Adjunct Clinical Lecturer, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan; and Dr. Inglehart is Professor, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry and Adjunct Professor, Department of Psychology, College of Literature, Science, and Arts, University of Michigan. mri@umich.edu.

Abstract

In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

KEYWORDS:

PA 161; community health care; dental education; dental health services; dental hygiene; dental hygiene education; dental hygienists; direct access model; prevention; public health

PMID:
27587574
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center