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Allergy Asthma Immunol Res. 2016 Nov;8(6):535-40. doi: 10.4168/aair.2016.8.6.535.

A Multicenter Retrospective Case Study of Anaphylaxis Triggers by Age in Korean Children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
3
Department of Pediatrics, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
7
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Korea University, College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
9
Department of Pediatrics, Pusan Saint Maria Hospital, Busan, Korea.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
11
Department of Pediatrics, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan, Korea.
12
Department of Pediatrics, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
13
Department of Pediatrics, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
14
Department of Pediatrics, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
15
Department of Pediatrics, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea.
16
Department of Pediatrics, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
17
Department of Pediatrics, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea. jsjs87@ajou.ac.kr.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Although anaphylaxis is recognized as an important, life-threatening condition, data are limited regarding its triggers in different age groups. We aimed to identify anaphylaxis triggers by age in Korean children.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective review of medical records for children diagnosed with anaphylaxis between 2009 and 2013 in 23 secondary or tertiary hospitals in South Korea.

RESULTS:

A total of 991 cases (mean age=5.89±5.24) were reported, with 63.9% involving patients younger than 6 years of age and 66% involving male children. Food was the most common anaphylaxis trigger (74.7%), followed by drugs and radiocontrast media (10.7%), idiopathic factors (9.2%), and exercise (3.6%). The most common food allergen was milk (28.4%), followed by egg white (13.6%), walnut (8.0%), wheat (7.2%), buckwheat (6.5%), and peanut (6.2%). Milk and seafood were the most common anaphylaxis triggers in young and older children, respectively. Drug-triggered anaphylaxis was observed more frequently with increasing age, with antibiotics (34.9%) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (17.9%) being the most common causes.

CONCLUSIONS:

The most common anaphylaxis trigger in Korean children was food. Data on these triggers show that their relative frequency may vary by age.

KEYWORDS:

Anaphylaxis; children; epidemiology

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