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Sci Rep. 2016 Sep 1;6:32408. doi: 10.1038/srep32408.

Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Switching of Ferromagnetic Resonance in NiFe/PLZT Multiferroic Thin Film Heterostructures.

Author information

1
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
2
Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433, USA.
3
Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education &International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, China.
4
Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA.
5
Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

Magnetoelectric effect, arising from the interfacial coupling between magnetic and electrical order parameters, has recently emerged as a robust means to electrically manipulate the magnetic properties in multiferroic heterostructures. Challenge remains as finding an energy efficient way to modify the distinct magnetic states in a reliable, reversible, and non-volatile manner. Here we report ferroelectric switching of ferromagnetic resonance in multiferroic bilayers consisting of ultrathin ferromagnetic NiFe and ferroelectric Pb0.92La0.08Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PLZT) films, where the magnetic anisotropy of NiFe can be electrically modified by low voltages. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements confirm that the interfacial charge-mediated magnetoelectric effect is dominant in NiFe/PLZT heterostructures. Non-volatile modification of ferromagnetic resonance field is demonstrated by applying voltage pulses. The ferroelectric switching of magnetic anisotropy exhibits extensive applications in energy-efficient electronic devices such as magnetoelectric random access memories, magnetic field sensors, and tunable radio frequency (RF)/microwave devices.

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