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Citizens' Access to Their Digital Health Data in Eleven Countries - A Comparative Study.

Author information

1
Dept. of Development and Planning, Aalborg University, Denmark.
2
School of Engineering & ICT, University of Tasmania, Australia.
3
e-Medicine Laboratory, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
4
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
5
Dept. of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Dept. of Health Information Management, Directorate of Health, Reykjavik, Iceland.
7
Dept. of Information, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
8
INSERM CIC-IT 1403, Univ. Lille Nord de France, CHU Lille, UDSL EA 2694.
9
Centre of Medical Informatics, University of Edinburgh, UK.
10
School of Population Health, The University of Auckland, New Zealand.
11
School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada.

Abstract

Governments around the world are actively promoting citizens electronic access to their health data as one of a number of ways to respond to the challenges of health care delivery in the 21st century. While numerous approaches have been utilized it is evident from cross-country comparisons that there are different conceptualizations of: both the expected and desired roles for citizens in the management of their own health; the benefits that will be delivered by citizen access and how these benefits should be measured and benchmarked over-time. This paper presents comparative analyses of the methods by which citizens are provided with access to their own health data across 11 countries. The paper aims to stimulate debate on electronic citizen access to health data and the challenges of measuring benefit as well as reflection on capacity of different citizens to engage with e-health.

PMID:
27577472
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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