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Nat Rev Microbiol. 2016 Nov;14(11):707-715. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro.2016.125. Epub 2016 Aug 30.

Zika virus - reigniting the TORCH.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219, USA; and the Magee-Womens Research Institute, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA.
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA.

Abstract

The recent association between Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy and fetal microcephaly has led to a renewed interest in the mechanisms by which vertically transmitted microorganisms reach the fetus and cause congenital disease. In this Opinion article, we provide an overview of the structure and cellular composition of the human placenta and of the mechanisms by which traditional 'TORCH' pathogens (Toxoplasma gondii, other, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus) access the fetal compartment. Based on our current understanding of ZIKV pathogenesis and the developmental defects that are caused by fetal ZIKV infection, ZIKV should be considered a TORCH pathogen and future research and public health measures should be planned and implemented accordingly.

PMID:
27573577
DOI:
10.1038/nrmicro.2016.125
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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