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Prev Med. 2016 Oct;91:287-293. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.08.027. Epub 2016 Aug 26.

Tobacco outlet density near home and school: Associations with smoking and norms among US teens.

Author information

1
Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, United States.
2
Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland, OR, United States.
3
Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, United States. Electronic address: lhenriksen@stanford.edu.

Abstract

This study examined whether living or going to school in neighborhoods with higher tobacco outlet density is associated with higher odds of cigarette smoking among teens, and with perceptions of greater smoking prevalence and peer approval. Using an Internet panel that is representative of US households, we matched data from teen-parent pairs (n=2771, surveyed June 2011-December 2012) with environmental data about home and school neighborhoods. Density was measured as the number of tobacco outlets per square mile for a ½-mile roadway service area around each participant's home and school. Logistic regressions tested relationships between tobacco outlet density near home and schools with ever smoking. Linear regressions tested relationships between density, perceived prevalence and peer approval. Models were adjusted for teen, parent/household and neighborhood characteristics. In total, 41.0% of US teens (ages 13-16) lived within ½ mile of a tobacco outlet, and 44.4% attended school within 1000ft of a tobacco outlet. Higher tobacco outlet density near home was associated with higher odds of ever smoking, although the relationship was small, OR=1.01, 95% CI (1.00, 1.02). Higher tobacco outlet density near home was also associated with perceptions that more adults smoked, coef.=0.09, 95% CI (0.01, 0.17). Higher tobacco outlet density near schools was not associated with any outcomes. Living in neighborhoods with higher tobacco outlet density may contribute to teen smoking by increasing access to tobacco products and by cultivating perceptions that smoking is more prevalent. Policy interventions to restrict tobacco outlet density should not be limited to school environments.

PMID:
27569829
PMCID:
PMC5065244
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.08.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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