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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2016 Sep;24(9):1874-83. doi: 10.1002/oby.21581.

A randomized pilot study comparing zero-calorie alternate-day fasting to daily caloric restriction in adults with obesity.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
2
Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Colorado School of Public Health, Anschutz Health and Wellness Center, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital Colorado Research Institute, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
5
Department of Community and Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
6
Kaiser Permanente, Denver, Colorado, USA.
7
Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
8
Department of Neuroscience, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
9
Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
10
Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the safety and tolerability of alternate-day fasting (ADF) and to compare changes in weight, body composition, lipids, and insulin sensitivity index (Si) with those produced by a standard weight loss diet, moderate daily caloric restriction (CR).

METHODS:

Adults with obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) , age 18-55) were randomized to either zero-calorie ADF (n = 14) or CR (-400 kcal/day, n = 12) for 8 weeks. Outcomes were measured at the end of the 8-week intervention and after 24 weeks of unsupervised follow-up.

RESULTS:

No adverse effects were attributed to ADF, and 93% completed the 8-week ADF protocol. At 8 weeks, ADF achieved a 376 kcal/day greater energy deficit; however, there were no significant between-group differences in change in weight (mean ± SE; ADF -8.2 ± 0.9 kg, CR -7.1 ± 1.0 kg), body composition, lipids, or Si. After 24 weeks of unsupervised follow-up, there were no significant differences in weight regain; however, changes from baseline in % fat mass and lean mass were more favorable in ADF.

CONCLUSIONS:

ADF is a safe and tolerable approach to weight loss. ADF produced similar changes in weight, body composition, lipids, and Si at 8 weeks and did not appear to increase risk for weight regain 24 weeks after completing the intervention.

PMID:
27569118
PMCID:
PMC5042570
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21581
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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