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Neurobiol Learn Mem. 2017 Feb;138:182-197. doi: 10.1016/j.nlm.2016.08.015. Epub 2016 Aug 26.

Persistent modifications of hippocampal synaptic function during remote spatial memory.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, The Robert F. Furchgott Center for Neural and Behavioral Science, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA; The Robert F. Furchgott Center for Neural and Behavioral, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA.
2
Graduate Program in Neural and Behavioral Science, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA.
3
The Robert F. Furchgott Center for Neural and Behavioral, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA; Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA; Center for Neural Science, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, USA. Electronic address: afenton@nyu.edu.
4
Department of Pathology, The Robert F. Furchgott Center for Neural and Behavioral Science, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA; The Robert F. Furchgott Center for Neural and Behavioral, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA. Electronic address: juanmarcos.alarcon@downstate.edu.

Abstract

A widely accepted notion for a process underlying memory formation is that learning changes the efficacy of synapses by the mechanism of synaptic plasticity. While there is compelling evidence of changes in synaptic efficacy observed after learning, demonstration of persistent synaptic changes accompanying memory has been elusive. We report that acquisition of a hippocampus and long-term potentiation dependent place memory persistently changes the function of CA1 synapses. Using extracellular recordings we measured CA3-CA1 and EC-CA1 synaptic responses and found robust changes in the CA3-CA1 pathway after memory training. Crucially, these changes in synaptic function lasted at least a month and coincided with the persistence of long-term place memories; the changes were only observed in animals that expressed robust memory, and not in animals with poor memory recall. Interestingly, our findings were observed at the level of populations of synapses; suggesting that memory formation recruits widespread synaptic circuits and persistently reorganizes their function to store information.

KEYWORDS:

Active place avoidance; CA1; Hippocampus; Memory; Remote memory; Schema; Synaptic circuits; Synaptic plasticity

PMID:
27568918
PMCID:
PMC5326703
DOI:
10.1016/j.nlm.2016.08.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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