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J Clin Sleep Med. 2016 Nov 15;12(11):1517-1525.

Sleep Misperception in Chronic Insomnia Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Implications for Clinical Assessment.

Choi SJ1,2, Suh S3,4, Ong J5, Joo EY2,6.

Author information

1
Department of Nursing, Samsung Medical Center, Department of Clinical Nursing Science, Graduate School of Clinical Nursing Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Center, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
3
Sungshin Women's University, Department of Psychology, Seoul, Korea.
4
Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry, Palo Alto, CA.
5
Rush University, Department of Behavioral Sciences, Chicago, IL.
6
Department of Health Sciences and Technology, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To investigate whether sleep perception (SP), defined by the ratio of subjective and objective total sleep time, and habitual sleep time in various sleep disorders may be based on comorbid insomnia status.

METHODS:

We enrolled 420 patients (age 20-79 y) who underwent polysomnography (PSG). They were divided into three groups based on chief complaints: chronic insomnia (CI, n = 69), patients with both obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia (OSA-I, n = 49) or OSA only (OSA, n = 149). Healthy volunteers were also recruited (normal controls [NC], n = 80). We compared differences in PSG parameters and habitual sleep duration and investigated the discrepancy between objective and subjective total sleep time (TST) and sleep latency among four groups. Subjective TST was defined as sleep time perceived by participants the next morning of PSG.

RESULTS:

SP for TST was highest in the OSA group (median 92.9%), and lowest in the CI group (80.3%). SP of the NC group (91.4%) was higher than the CI, but there was no difference between OSA-I and OSA groups. OSA-I had higher depressive mood compared to the OSA group (p < 0.001). SP was positively associated with the presence of OSA and habitual sleep duration and negatively related to the presence of insomnia and arousal index of PSG. Insomnia patients with (OSA-I) or without OSA (CI) reported the smallest discrepancy between habitual sleep duration and objective TST.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with OSA with or without insomnia have different PSG profiles, which suggests that objective measures of sleep are an important consideration for differentiating subtypes of insomnia and tailoring proper treatment.

COMMENTARY:

A commentary on this articles appears in this issue on page 1437.

KEYWORDS:

chronic insomnia; obstructive sleep apnea; sleep perception

PMID:
27568893
PMCID:
PMC5078707
DOI:
10.5664/jcsm.6280
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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