Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Res. 2017 Jan;152:360-368. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2016.04.019. Epub 2016 Aug 25.

Placental biomarkers of PAH exposure and glutathione-S-transferase biotransformation enzymes in an obstetric population from Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico.

Author information

1
California State University San Bernardino, Department of Nursing, 5500 University Parkway, San Bernardino, CA 92407, USA; San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego, CA, USA; Union Institute & University, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Electronic address: tdbutera@csusb.edu.
2
San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego, CA, USA. Electronic address: jquintan@mail.sdsu.edu.
3
Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social Tijuana, BC, Mexico. Electronic address: martharz8@hotmail.com.
4
Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social Tijuana, BC, Mexico; Hospital General de Tijuana, Tijuana, Mexico. Electronic address: anabatista101@hotmail.com.
5
San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego, CA, USA. Electronic address: sierramer@gmail.com.
6
San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego, CA, USA; University of California, San Diego, Western FASD Practice and Implementation Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Dysmorphology-Teratology, San Diego, CA, USA. Electronic address: cshaputnic@ucsd.edu.
7
Xochicalco Universidad Escuela de Medicina, BC, Mexico; Institute for Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA. Electronic address: mauragarcia@gmail.com.
8
San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego, CA, USA. Electronic address: sonejah@yahoo.com.
9
San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego, CA, USA. Electronic address: hulst74@hotmail.com.

Abstract

Environmental exposures along the US-Mexico border have the potential to adversely affect the maternal-fetal environment. The purpose of this study was to assess placental biomarkers of environmental exposures in an obstetric population at the California-Baja California border in relation to detoxifying enzymes in the placenta and nutritional status. This study was conducted on consenting, full-term, obstetric patients (n=54), delivering in a hospital in Tijuana, Baja California (BC), Mexico. Placental polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts were measured in addition to placental glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity and genotype, maternal serum folate, and maternal and umbilical cord blood lead and cadmium levels. A questionnaire was administered to the mothers to determine maternal occupation in a maquiladora, other exposures, and obstetric indicators. In univariate analysis, maternal serum folate levels were inversely correlated with total PAH-DNA adducts (rho=-0.375, p=0.007); adduct #1 (rho=-0.388, p=0.005); and adduct #3 (rho =-0.430, p=0.002). Maternal lead levels were significantly positively correlated with cord blood lead levels (rho=0.512, p<0.001). Cadmium levels were generally very low but significantly higher in mothers exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) (either at work or at home, n=10). In multivariate analysis, only maternal serum folate levels remained as a significant negative predictor of total DNA-PAH adducts levels in placenta. These findings affirm that placental tissue is a valuable and readily available source of human tissue for biomonitoring; and indicate that further study of the role of nutrition in detoxification and mitigation of environmental exposures in pregnant women is warranted.

KEYWORDS:

Biotransformation enzymes; Maternal-fetal environment; Placental biomonitoring; Polyaromatic hydrocarbons; US-Mexico border

PMID:
27567517
DOI:
10.1016/j.envres.2016.04.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center