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Surg Oncol. 2016 Sep;25(3):184-9. doi: 10.1016/j.suronc.2016.05.017. Epub 2016 May 20.

MicroRNA dysregulation in melanoma.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address: Nicholas.Latchana@osumc.edu.
2
Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address: Aganju@neomed.edu.
3
Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address: John.Howard@osumc.edu.
4
Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA; Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Arthur G. James Comprehensive Cancer Center and Richard J. Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address: William.Carson@osumc.edu.

Abstract

Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer. Current challenges facing the management of melanoma include accurate prediction of individuals who will respond to adjuvant therapies as well as early detection of recurrences. These and other challenges have prompted investigation into biomarkers that could be used as diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic aids. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small 19-22 nucleotide RNA inhibitors of protein translation. Over 800 different miRs are present within cells and importantly miR expression profiles may vary across different cells types and stages of malignancy. Unique expression profiles have been described for malignant melanoma; however, this work has yet to be translated into routine clinical practice. We highlight pertinent studies involving common miRs implicated in the oncogenesis of melanoma including miR-21, miR-125b, miR-150, miR-155, miR-205, and miR-211. In particular, emphasis is placed upon differential expression across different stages of melanoma progression, prognostic implications and potential mechanistic involvement. Focused efforts on inhibition of these miRs could be the most efficient method of translating preclinical endeavors into clinically meaningful applications.

KEYWORDS:

Melanoma; MicroRNA

PMID:
27566021
DOI:
10.1016/j.suronc.2016.05.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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