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Pediatr Dent. 2016;38(4):317-24.

Success Rate of Treatments Provided for Early Childhood Caries under General Anesthesia: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Pediatric Dentistry, in the School of Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. maryam.amin@ualberta.ca.
2
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada; PDG Pediatric Dental Group, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
3
Pediatric dentist in private practice, Calgary, all in Alberta, Canada.
4
School of Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
5
Disciplines of Endodontics and Dental Public Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Clinician Scientist, Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to assess the success rate of various treatments provided under general anesthesia for early childhood caries (ECC) over three-year follow-up period.

METHODS:

ECC children no older than 72 months at the time of dental surgery, who had completed a three-year follow-up, were included. The success rate of every treatment was evaluated. The longevity of each treatment and significant factors associated with failures were assessed.

RESULTS:

A total of 818 children (55.8 percent were males with a mean age of 46.2±13.4 months old) were included. Of these, 32.9 percent had restored teeth that required further treatment during the three-year follow-up. Amalgam restorations and stainless steel crowns (SSCs) showed significantly longer survival than composite restorations in all types of restorations (P<.05). The survival rate of both indirect pulp capping and pulpotomies were the same (P=0.234), and they were significantly higher than that for pulpectomies (P=0.001, P=0.039, respectively). The lower lingual holding arch (LLHA) had a significantly lower survival rate than other space maintainers (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

SSCs and amalgam restorations were clinically more successful and had better survival times than composite restorations. The survival rate for the LLHA was low compared to other space maintainers.

PMID:
27557921
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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