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Int J Sports Med. 2016 Dec;37(13):1060-1065. Epub 2016 Aug 24.

Jump Training in Youth Soccer Players: Effects of Haltere Type Handheld Loading.

Author information

1
Roses of Buenos Aires Sport Club, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
2
Department of Physical Activity Sciences, Universidad de Los Lagos, Osorno, Chile.
3
Faculty of Health, Universidad Santo Tomas, Osorno, Chile.
4
Faculty of Physical Activity Sciences, Universidad San Sebastian, Valdivia, Chile.
5
Department of Physical Education, Sport and Recreation, Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
6
Laboratory of Physiology and Biomechanics, Universidad Autonoma de Chile, Temuco, Chile.
7
Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile.
8
NAR - Nucleus of High Performance in Sport, Sport Science, São Paulo, Brazil.
9
Sports Performance Research Institute, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.
10
Department of Sports Medicine, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
11
Faculty of Education, Universidad Pontificia de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.
12
Department of Health Sciences, Public University of Navarre, Tudela, Spain.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a jump training program, with or without haltere type handheld loading, on maximal intensity exercise performance. Youth soccer players (12.1±2.2 y) were assigned to either a jump training group (JG, n=21), a jump training group plus haltere type handheld loading (LJG, n=21), or a control group following only soccer training (CG, n=21). Athletes were evaluated for maximal-intensity performance measures before and after 6 weeks of training, during an in-season training period. The CG achieved a significant change in maximal kicking velocity only (ES=0.11-0.20). Both jump training groups improved in right leg (ES=0.28-0.45) and left leg horizontal countermovement jump with arms (ES=0.32-0.47), horizontal countermovement jump with arms (ES=0.28-0.37), vertical countermovement jump with arms (ES=0.26), 20-cm drop jump reactive strength index (ES=0.20-0.37), and maximal kicking velocity (ES=0.27-0.34). Nevertheless, compared to the CG, only the LJG exhibited greater improvements in all performance tests. Therefore, haltere type handheld loading further enhances performance adaptations during jump training in youth soccer players.

PMID:
27557406
DOI:
10.1055/s-0042-111046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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