Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Sex Med. 2016 Sep;13(9):1333-1346. doi: 10.1016/j.jsxm.2016.06.014.

Blood Pressure, Sexual Activity, and Dysfunction in Women With Hypertension: Baseline Findings From the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT).

Author information

1
Wake Forest School of Medicine, Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. Electronic address: cfoy@wakehealth.edu.
2
Wake Forest School of Medicine, Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
3
Bedford VA Hospital, Bedford, MA and Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases, The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), Bethesda, MD, USA.
5
University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Birmingham, AL, USA.
6
University of Pittsburgh, Division of General Internal Medicine, Section of Women's Health, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
7
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology and Brain Health and Memory Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.
8
National Institutes of Health, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Sexual function, an important component of quality of life, is gaining increased research and clinical attention in older women with hypertension.

AIM:

To assess the association between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and other variables, and sexual activity and sexual dysfunction in hypertensive women.

METHODS:

Baseline analysis of 635 women participants of a larger randomized clinical trial of 9361 men and women.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Self-reported sexual activity (yes/no), and sexual function using the Female Sexual Function Inventory (FSFI).

RESULTS:

452 participants (71.2%) reported having no sexual activity during the previous 4 weeks. The mean (SD) FSFI score for sexually active participants was 25.3 (6.0), and 52.6% of the sample reported a FSFI score ≤26.55 designating sexual dysfunction. In logistic regression models, SBP was not significantly associated with sexual activity (AOR = 1.002; P > .05). Older age (AOR = 0.95, P < .05), and lower education (AOR for < high school vs college degree = 0.29, P < .05) were associated with lower odds of being sexually active, as was living alone versus living with others (AOR = 0.56, P < .05). Higher weekly alcohol consumption was associated with increased odds of being sexually active (AOR = 1.39; P < .05). In logistic regression models among sexually active participants, SBP was not associated with sexual dysfunction (AOR = 1.01; P > .05). Higher depressive symptoms from the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) was associated with higher odds of sexual dysfunction (AOR = 1.24, P < .05), as was increased number of physical comorbidities (AOR = 1.25, P < .05). Diuretic use was associated with lower odds of being sexually active in participants with chronic kidney disease (AOR = 0.33, P < .05).

CONCLUSION:

Younger age, higher education, living with others, and higher weekly alcohol consumption were significantly associated with higher odds of being sexually active in a sample of middle-aged and older women with hypertension. Increased depressive symptoms and increased physical comorbidities were significantly associated with increased odds of sexual dysfunction. SBP was not significantly associated with sexual activity or sexual dysfunction.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01206062.

KEYWORDS:

Antihypertensive Medications; Blood Pressure; Older Women; Sexual Activity; Sexual Function

PMID:
27555505
PMCID:
PMC5030072
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsxm.2016.06.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Publication type, MeSH terms, Secondary source ID, Grant support

Publication type

MeSH terms

Secondary source ID

Grant support

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center