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Rev Endocr Metab Disord. 2016 Dec;17(4):559-569. doi: 10.1007/s11154-016-9380-1.

Thyroid hormone regulation of adult intestinal stem cells: Implications on intestinal development and homeostasis.

Author information

1
School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072, People's Republic of China.
2
Section on Molecular Morphogenesis, Program in Cellular Regulation and Metabolism (PCRM), Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), 18 Library Dr., Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA.
3
Section on Molecular Morphogenesis, Program in Cellular Regulation and Metabolism (PCRM), Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), 18 Library Dr., Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. Shi@helix.nih.gov.

Abstract

Organ-specific adult stem cells are essential for organ homeostasis, tissue repair and regeneration. The formation of such stem cells often takes place during postembryonic development, a period around birth in mammals when plasma thyroid hormone concentration is high. The life-long self-renewal of the intestinal epithelium has made mammalian intestine a valuable model to study the function and regulation and adult stem cells. On the other hand, much less is known about how the adult intestinal stem cells are formed during vertebrate development. Here, we will review some recent progresses on this subject, focusing mainly on the formation of the adult intestine during Xenopus metamorphosis. We will discuss the role of thyroid hormone signaling pathway in the process and potential molecular conservations between amphibians and mammals as well as the implications in organ homeostasis and human diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Intestine; Metamorphosis; Postembryonic development; Stem cell; Thyroid hormone receptor; Xenopus laevis and tropicalis

PMID:
27554108
DOI:
10.1007/s11154-016-9380-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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