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Int J Obes (Lond). 2016 Nov;40(11):1707-1714. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2016.149. Epub 2016 Aug 24.

Oxytocin's inhibitory effect on food intake is stronger in obese than normal-weight men.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Psychology and Behavioural Neurobiology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
2
German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Tübingen, Germany.
3
Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of the Helmholtz Centre Munich at the University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology, Angiology, Nephrology and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
5
Department of Psychology, Laboratory for Biological and Personality Psychology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
6
Freiburg Brain Imaging Center, University Medical Center, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
7
Department of Internal Medicine I, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Animal studies and pilot experiments in men indicate that the hypothalamic neuropeptide oxytocin limits food intake, and raise the question of its potential to improve metabolic control in obesity.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

We compared the effect of central nervous oxytocin administration (24 IU) via the intranasal route on ingestive behaviour and metabolic function in 18 young obese men with the results in a group of 20 normal-weight men. In double-blind, placebo-controlled experiments, ad libitum food intake from a test buffet was examined in fasted subjects 45 min after oxytocin administration, followed by the assessment of postprandial, reward-driven snack intake. Energy expenditure was repeatedly assessed by indirect calorimetry and blood was sampled to determine concentrations of blood glucose and hormones.

RESULTS:

Oxytocin markedly reduced hunger-driven food intake in the fasted state in obese but not in normal-weight men, and led to a reduction in snack consumption in both groups, whereas energy expenditure remained generally unaffected. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis secretion and the postprandial rise in plasma glucose were blunted by oxytocin in both groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Oxytocin exerts an acutely inhibitory impact on food intake that is enhanced rather than decreased in obese compared with normal-weight men. This pattern puts it in contrast to other metabolically active neuropeptides and bodes well for clinical applications of oxytocin in the treatment of metabolic disorders.

PMID:
27553712
PMCID:
PMC5116063
DOI:
10.1038/ijo.2016.149
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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