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Semin Nucl Med. 2016 Sep;46(5):448-61. doi: 10.1053/j.semnuclmed.2016.04.002.

Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

Author information

1
Centre for Molecular Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia; University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: michael.hofman@petermac.org.
2
Centre for Molecular Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia; University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT for measuring glomerular filtration rate and split renal function.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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