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Twin Res Hum Genet. 2016 Oct;19(5):407-17. doi: 10.1017/thg.2016.65. Epub 2016 Aug 22.

Personality Polygenes, Positive Affect, and Life Satisfaction.

Author information

1
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology,Department of Psychology,School of Philosophy,Psychology and Language Sciences,The University of Edinburgh,Edinburgh,UK.
2
Department of Biological Psychology,Netherlands Twin Register,VU University Amsterdam,Amsterdam,the Netherlands.
3
Clinical Division of Neurogeriatrics,Department of Neurology,Medical University Graz,Austria.
4
Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center,Rush University Medical Center,Chicago,IL,USA.
5
Department of Applied Economics,Erasmus School of Economics,Erasmus University Rotterdam,Rotterdam,the Netherlands.
6
Quantitative Genetics,QIMR Berghofer Institute of Medical Research,Brisbane,Queensland,Australia.
7
Department of Psychology,University of Minnesota,USA.
8
Department of Epidemiology,University of Groningen,Groningen,the Netherlands.
9
Survey Research Center,Institute for Social Research,University of Michigan,Ann Arbor,MI,USA.
10
Department of Epidemiology,School of Public Health,University of Michigan,Ann Arbor,MI,USA.
11
Interdisciplinary Center Psychopathology and Emotion regulation,University Medical Center,University of Groningen,Groningen,the Netherlands.
12
Department of Epidemiology,Erasmus Medical Center,Rotterdam,the Netherlands.
13
Department of Neuroscience,Karolinska Institutet,Stockholm,Sweden.
14
Program in Translational NeuroPsychiatric Genomics,Institute for the Neurosciences,Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry,Brigham and Women's Hospital,Boston,MA,USA.
15
Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences,Washington University,MO,USA.
16
Institute of Behavioural Sciences,University of Helsinki,Finland.
17
Geriatric Medicine Unit,Western General Hospital,Edinburgh,and Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology,University of Edinburgh,UK.
18
Department of Economics,Stockholm School of Economics,Stockholm,Sweden.
19
Department of Economics,New York University,New York,USA.
20
IBS,Unit of Personality,Work and Health,Institute of Behavioural Sciences,University of Helsinki,Finland.
21
Department of Neurology,Medical University Graz,Austria.
22
Department of Psychology,University of Michigan,Ann Arbor,MI,USA.
23
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics,Karolinska Institutet,Stockholm,Sweden.

Abstract

Approximately half of the variation in wellbeing measures overlaps with variation in personality traits. Studies of non-human primate pedigrees and human twins suggest that this is due to common genetic influences. We tested whether personality polygenic scores for the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) domains and for item response theory (IRT) derived extraversion and neuroticism scores predict variance in wellbeing measures. Polygenic scores were based on published genome-wide association (GWA) results in over 17,000 individuals for the NEO-FFI and in over 63,000 for the IRT extraversion and neuroticism traits. The NEO-FFI polygenic scores were used to predict life satisfaction in 7 cohorts, positive affect in 12 cohorts, and general wellbeing in 1 cohort (maximal N = 46,508). Meta-analysis of these results showed no significant association between NEO-FFI personality polygenic scores and the wellbeing measures. IRT extraversion and neuroticism polygenic scores were used to predict life satisfaction and positive affect in almost 37,000 individuals from UK Biobank. Significant positive associations (effect sizes <0.05%) were observed between the extraversion polygenic score and wellbeing measures, and a negative association was observed between the polygenic neuroticism score and life satisfaction. Furthermore, using GWA data, genetic correlations of -0.49 and -0.55 were estimated between neuroticism with life satisfaction and positive affect, respectively. The moderate genetic correlation between neuroticism and wellbeing is in line with twin research showing that genetic influences on wellbeing are also shared with other independent personality domains.

KEYWORDS:

genetic correlation; genetics; happiness; polygenic prediction; wellbeing

PMID:
27546527
PMCID:
PMC5125297
DOI:
10.1017/thg.2016.65
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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