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J Pers Soc Psychol. 1989 Jul;57(1):55-66.

Relation of sympathy and personal distress to prosocial behavior: a multimethod study.

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1
Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287.

Abstract

Assessed sympathy and personal distress with facial and physiological indexes (heart rate) as well as self-report indexes and examined the relations of these various indexes to prosocial behavior for children and adults in an easy escape condition. Heart rate deceleration during exposure to the needy others was associated with increased willingness to help. In addition, adults' reports of sympathy, as well as facial sadness and concerned attention, were positively related to their intention to assist. For children, there was some indication that report of positive affect and facial distress were negatively related to prosocial intentions and behavior, whereas facial concern was positively related to the indexes of prosocial behavior. These findings are interpreted as providing additional, convergent support for the notion that sympathy and personal distress are differentially related to prosocial behavior.

PMID:
2754604
DOI:
10.1037//0022-3514.57.1.55
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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