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J Voice. 2017 Mar;31(2):248.e7-248.e10. doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2016.07.025. Epub 2016 Aug 17.

Vocal Fatigue Symptoms and Laryngeal Status in Relation to Vocal Activity Limitation and Participation Restriction.

Author information

1
Speech and Voice Research Laboratory, School of Education, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Electronic address: Irma.ilomaki@uta.fi.
2
Speech and Voice Research Laboratory, School of Education, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Phoniatrics, Tampere University Hospital and School of Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
3
Speech and Voice Research Laboratory, School of Education, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
4
Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Phoniatrics, Tampere University Hospital and School of Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
5
Department of Otolaryngology and Phoniatrics-Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Tampere, Finland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The study aims to investigate the vocal fatigue symptoms and laryngeal status in relation to vocal activity limitations and vocal participation restrictions.

STUDY DESIGN:

This is a case-control study.

METHODS:

Two hundred six teachers were divided into two groups based on the frequency of their self-reported vocal symptoms being more or less than the mean of reported frequency. The study compared odds for activity limitation and participation restriction in relation to frequency of vocal symptoms, number of vocal symptoms recurring weekly, and organic laryngeal changes. Activity limitation and participation restriction were studied using the Voice Activity and Participation Profile questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Increased odds were found for teachers with frequent vocal symptoms and especially those with one or more vocal symptom recurring weekly. Odds were found to be 2.6-8.5 times more likely in teachers with more frequent vocal symptoms. The odds increased dramatically with increase of the number of vocal symptoms recurring weekly. Laryngeal organic changes were found to increase the odds but insignificantly.

CONCLUSIONS:

Teachers with frequent vocal symptoms, especially those with vocal symptoms recurring weekly, have increased odds ratio for vocal activity limitation and vocal participation restrictions. High scores or frequent occurrence of self-reported vocal fatigue symptoms must be taken seriously in the evaluation of vocal working ability.

KEYWORDS:

Evaluation of vocal working ability; Frequent vocal fatigue symptoms; Laryngeal examination; Teacher's voice; VAPP

PMID:
27544637
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvoice.2016.07.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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