Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Prev Sci. 2016 Oct;17(7):779-84. doi: 10.1007/s11121-016-0704-x.

Methodological and Design Considerations in Evaluating the Impact of Prevention Programs on Violence and Related Health Outcomes.

Author information

1
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. gmassetti@cdc.gov.
2
Present Address: Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, MS K76, 30341, Atlanta, GA, USA. gmassetti@cdc.gov.
3
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
4
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Abstract

Drawing on research that has identified specific predictors and trajectories of risk for violence and related negative outcomes, a multitude of small- and large-scale preventive interventions for specific risk behaviors have been developed, implemented, and evaluated. One of the principal challenges of these approaches is that a number of separate problem-specific programs targeting different risk areas have emerged. However, as many negative health behaviors such as substance abuse and violence share a multitude of risk factors, many programs target identical risk factors. There are opportunities to understand whether evidence-based programs can be leveraged for potential effects across a spectrum of outcomes and over time. Some recent work has documented longitudinal effects of evidence-based interventions on generalized outcomes. This work has potential for advancing our understanding of the effectiveness of promising and evidence-based prevention strategies. However, conducting longitudinal follow-up of established interventions presents a number of methodological and design challenges. To answer some of these questions, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened a panel of multidisciplinary experts to discuss opportunities to take advantage of evaluations of early prevention programs and evaluating multiple long-term outcomes. This special section of the journal Prevention Science includes a series of papers that begin to address the relevant considerations for conducting longitudinal follow-up evaluation research. This collection of papers is intended to inform our understanding of the challenges and strategies for conducting longitudinal follow-up evaluation research that could be used to drive future research endeavors.

KEYWORDS:

Evaluation; Long-term effects; Prevention science

PMID:
27543077
DOI:
10.1007/s11121-016-0704-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center