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BMC Med Ethics. 2016 Aug 20;17(1):50. doi: 10.1186/s12910-016-0134-0.

Perceptions of the general public and physicians regarding open disclosure in Korea: a qualitative study.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
2
Department of Nursing Science, Shinsung University, Dangjin, South Korea.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. sleemd@amc.seoul.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Experience with open disclosure and its study are restricted to certain western countries. In addition, there are concerns that open disclosure may be less suitable in non-western countries. The present study explored and compared the in-depth perceptions of the general public and physicians regarding open disclosure in Korea.

METHODS:

We applied the COREQ (Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research) checklist to this qualitative study. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews and four focus group discussions with 16 physicians and 18 members of the general public. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were performed according to semi-structured guidelines developed according to a systematic review of open disclosure. We conducted a directed content analysis by analyzing the verbatim transcripts and field notes in accordance with the predetermined guidelines.

RESULTS:

Open disclosure perceptions were summarized in terms of the "five Ws and one H" (who, what, where, when, why, and how). All physician and general public participants acknowledged the normative justifiability of open disclosure. The participants mostly agreed on the known effects of open disclosure, but the physicians had negative opinions on its expected effects, such as decreased intention of the general public to file lawsuits and increased credibility of medical professionals. Generally, the participants thought that open disclosure is required for medical errors causing major harm. However, the physicians and general public had conflicting opinions on the need for open disclosure of near misses. Most physicians did not know how to conduct open disclosure and some physicians had bad experiences due to inappropriate or incomplete open disclosure.

CONCLUSION:

Physicians and the general public in Korea acknowledge the need for open disclosure. Guidelines according to the type of patient safety incident are required to encourage physicians to more readily conduct open disclosure. Furthermore, hospitals need to consider organizing a dedicated team and hiring experts for open disclosure.

KEYWORDS:

Focus group discussion; In-depth interview; Open disclosure; Patient safety

PMID:
27542889
PMCID:
PMC4992204
DOI:
10.1186/s12910-016-0134-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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