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Pediatr Int. 2017 Mar;59(3):309-315. doi: 10.1111/ped.13139. Epub 2016 Nov 6.

Antibacterial resistance patterns of pediatric community-acquired urinary infection: Overview.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, School of Medicine, Adiyaman University, Adiyaman, Turkey.
2
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Adiyaman University, Adiyaman, Turkey.
3
Department of Statistics, School of Medicine, Adiyaman University, Adiyaman, Turkey.
4
Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Adiyaman University, Adiyaman, Turkey.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in children. The aim of this study was therefor to construct a guide for the empirical antibiotic treatment of community-acquired UTI by investigating the etiology and antimicrobial resistance patterns of uropathogens and analyzing the epidemiological and clinical patient characteristics.

METHODS:

A total of 158 children with positive urine culture were included in the study. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed with Vitek 2 Compact for 28 commonly used antimicrobials.

RESULTS:

Mean age was 3.36 ± 3.38 years (range, 45 days-15 years). Escherichia coli (60.1%), and Klebsiella spp. (16.5%) were the most common uropathogens. For all Gram-negative isolates, a high level of resistance was found against ampicillin/sulbactam (60.1%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (44.2%), cefazolin (36.2%), cefuroxime sodium (33.5%), and amoxicillin/clavulanate (31.5%). A low level of resistance was noted against cefepime (8.7%), ertapenem (4.6%), norfloxacin (1.3%), and meropenem (0.7%). There was no resistance against amikacin.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is high antibiotic resistance in children with UTI. The patterns of uropathogen antimicrobial resistance vary in susceptibility to antimicrobials depending on region and time. Thus, the trends of antibiotic susceptibility patterns should be analyzed periodically to select the appropriate regimen for UTI treatment.

KEYWORDS:

antibiotic resistance; child; urinary tract infection; uropathogen

PMID:
27542568
DOI:
10.1111/ped.13139
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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