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Food Chem. 2017 Jan 15;215:354-61. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.07.178. Epub 2016 Jul 30.

Effect of solvent addition sequence on lycopene extraction efficiency from membrane neutralized caustic peeled tomato waste.

Author information

1
The Ohio State University, Department of Food Science & Technology, 2015 Fyffe Ct., Columbus, OH 432210, United States. Electronic address: Phinney.14@osu.edu.
2
The Ohio State University, Department of Food Science & Technology, 2015 Fyffe Ct., Columbus, OH 432210, United States. Electronic address: Frelka.1@buckeyemail.osu.edu.
3
The Ohio State University, Department of Food Science & Technology, 2015 Fyffe Ct., Columbus, OH 432210, United States. Electronic address: Cooperstone.1@osu.edu.
4
The Ohio State University, Department of Food Science & Technology, 2015 Fyffe Ct., Columbus, OH 432210, United States. Electronic address: Schwartz.177@osu.edu.
5
The Ohio State University, Department of Food Science & Technology, 2015 Fyffe Ct., Columbus, OH 432210, United States; The Ohio State University, Department of Food Agriculture & Biological Engineering, 590 Woody Hayes Drive, Columbus, OH 43210, United States. Electronic address: heldman.20@osu.edu.

Abstract

Lycopene is a high value nutraceutical and its isolation from waste streams is often desirable to maximize profits. This research investigated solvent addition order and composition on lycopene extraction efficiency from a commercial tomato waste stream (pH 12.5, solids ∼5%) that was neutralized using membrane filtration. Constant volume dilution (CVD) was used to desalinate the caustic salt to neutralize the waste. Acetone, ethanol and hexane were used as direct or blended additions. Extraction efficiency was defined as the amount of lycopene extracted divided by the total lycopene in the sample. The CVD operation reduced the active alkali of the waste from 0.66 to <0.01M and the moisture content of the pulp increased from 93% to 97% (wet basis), showing the removal of caustic salts from the waste. Extraction efficiency varied from 32.5% to 94.5%. This study demonstrates a lab scale feasibility to extract lycopene efficiently from tomato processing byproducts.

KEYWORDS:

Caustic peeled tomato waste; Chemical free neutralization; Extraction efficiency; Lycopene; Lycopene (PubChem CID: 446925); Membrane filtration; Solvent extraction; Waste recovery

PMID:
27542486
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.07.178
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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