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Food Chem. 2017 Jan 15;215:256-62. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.07.177. Epub 2016 Jul 30.

Salting-in effect on muscle protein extracted from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas).

Author information

1
Food Safety Key Laboratory of Zhejiang Province, The School of Food Science and Biotechnology, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018, China.
2
Food Safety Key Laboratory of Zhejiang Province, The School of Food Science and Biotechnology, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018, China. Electronic address: panweichun1@yahoo.com.
3
College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Food Safety, Province Key Laboratory of Food Quality Safety and Functional Food, Bohai University, Jinzhou, Liaoning 121013, China.

Abstract

The salting-in effect on muscle protein is well-known in food science but hard to explain using conventional theories. Myofibrillar protein extracted from the giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) was selected as a model muscle protein to study this mechanism in KCl solutions. Changes in the secondary structures of myofibrillar protein molecules caused by concentrated salts, particularly in the paramyosin molecule conformation, have been reported. Zeta-potential determinations showed that these secondary structures have modified protein molecule surfaces. The zeta-potential of the myofibrillar protein molecules fell from -7.24±0.82 to -9.99±1.65mV with increasing salt concentration from 0.1 to 0.5M. The corresponding second virial coefficient increased from -85.43±3.8×10(-7) to -3.45±1.3×10(-7) molmLg(-2). The extended law of corresponding states suggests that reduced attractive interactions increase the protein solubility. Solubility measurements in alternating KCl concentrations showed that the conformational change was reversible.

KEYWORDS:

Conformation modification; Myofibrillar protein; Potassium chloride; Salting-in effect; Secondary virial coefficient; Zeta-potential

PMID:
27542474
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.07.177
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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