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Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Aug;95(33):e4512. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000004512.

Severe gonadotoxic insult manifests early in young girls treated for Ewing sarcoma.

Author information

1
aDepartment of Pediatrics, Pediatric Oncology and Hematology bDepartment of Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology cDepartment of Orthopedics, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden dLaboratory of Reproductive Biology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

We prospectively investigated anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) as a measure of ovarian insult in young females during and after treatment for Wilms tumor (WT), osteosarcoma (OS), and Ewing sarcoma (ES).Twenty-one female childhood cancer patients, with a mean age of 7.9 years (range 0.6-17), entered the study. Levels of AMH, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone were monitored at diagnosis and every 3 to 4 months during, and regularly for a mean of 2.6 years after treatment.A profound decline in AMH was seen in the majority of the 21 study patients 3 to 4 months after the beginning of treatment, the exception being patients with WT, of whom 60% showed no such decline. During the remaining treatment, all patients except those with WT not treated with whole abdominal radiotherapy or stem cell transplantation (SCT) had AMH below detection limit.After completion of treatment, patients with OS and WT (without whole abdominal radiotherapy and SCT) recovered in AMH and had FSH in the normal range. In contrast, ES patients showed no AMH recovery and highly fluctuating FSH in the first years of follow-up, except for the 2 youngest patients, who had a late, slow AMH recovery.In conclusion, young female ES patients already showed signs of severe ovarian dysfunction during the first years after cancer treatment similar to patients treated with SCT and abdominal radiotherapy, in contrast to females with WT and OS. Fertility counseling and information concerning fertility preservation procedures should be considered before starting to treat young females with ES.

PMID:
27537574
PMCID:
PMC5370800
DOI:
10.1097/MD.0000000000004512
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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