Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Brain Res. 2016 Oct 1;1648(Pt A):434-437. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2016.08.017. Epub 2016 Aug 14.

Hyperbaric oxygen treatment suppresses withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA.
2
Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA.
3
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of the Pacific Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Stockton, CA, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA; Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA; Translational Addiction Research Center, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA. Electronic address: quockr@wsu.edu.

Abstract

Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy reportedly reduces opiate withdrawal in human subjects. The purpose of this research was to determine whether HBO2 treatment could suppress physical signs of withdrawal in opiate-dependent mice. Male NIH Swiss mice were injected s.c. with morphine sulfate twice a day for 4 days, the daily dose gradually increasing from 50mg/kg on day 1 to 125mg/kg on day 4. On day 5, withdrawal was precipitated by i.p. injection of 5.0mg/kg naloxone. Mice were observed for physical withdrawal signs, including jumping, forepaw tremor, wet-dog shakes, rearing and defecation for 30min. Sixty min prior to the naloxone injection, different groups of mice received either a 30-min or 60-min HBO2 treatment at 3.5atm absolute. HBO2 treatment significantly reduced naloxone-precipitated jumping, forepaw tremor, wet-dog shakes, rearing and defecation. Based on these experimental findings, we concluded that treatment with HBO2 can suppress physical signs of withdrawal syndrome in morphine-dependent mice.

KEYWORDS:

Hyperbaric oxygen; Morphine; Mouse; Opiate withdrawal; Physical dependence

PMID:
27534375
PMCID:
PMC5018463
DOI:
10.1016/j.brainres.2016.08.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center