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J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2016 Sep;22(8):816-27. doi: 10.1017/S1355617716000692. Epub 2016 Aug 18.

Alcohol Consumption Does not Impede Recovery from Mild to Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury.

Author information

1
1Division of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation,University of British Columbia,Vancouver,Canada.
2
5British Columbia Neuropsychiatry Program,University of British Columbia,Vancouver,Canada.
3
3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation,Harvard Medical School,Boston,Massachusetts.
4
8Department of Emergency Medicine,University of British Columbia,Vancouver,Canada.
5
9Department of Radiology,University of British Columbia,Vancouver,Canada.
6
6Department of Psychiatry,University of British Columbia,Vancouver,Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the effect of pre-injury alcohol use, acute alcohol intoxication, and post-injury alcohol use on outcome from mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI).

METHODS:

Prospective inception cohort of patients who presented to the Emergency Department with mild to moderate TBI and had a blood alcohol level (BAL) taken for clinical purposes. Those who completed the 1-year outcome assessment were eligible for this study (N=91). Outcomes of interest were the count of post-concussion symptoms (British Columbia Post-Concussion Symptom Inventory), low neuropsychological test scores (Neuropsychological Assessment Battery), and abnormal regions of interest on diffusion tensor imaging (low fractional anisotropy). The main predictors were pre-injury alcohol consumption (Cognitive Lifetime Drinking History interview), BAL, and post-injury alcohol use.

RESULTS:

The alcohol use variables were moderately to strongly inter-correlated. None of the alcohol use variables (whether continuous or categorical) were related to 1-year TBI outcomes in generalized linear modeling. Participants in this cohort generally had a good clinical outcome, regardless of their pre-, peri-, and post-injury alcohol use.

CONCLUSIONS:

Alcohol may not significantly alter long-term outcome from mild to moderate TBI. (JINS, 2016, 22, 816-827).

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol drinking; Alcohol-related disorders; Craniocerebral trauma; Diffusion tensor imaging; Magnetic resonance imaging; Neuropsychological tests; Postconcussion symptoms

PMID:
27534259
DOI:
10.1017/S1355617716000692
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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