Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Hepatology. 2016 Nov;64(5):1652-1666. doi: 10.1002/hep.28774. Epub 2016 Sep 26.

Wnt signaling regulates hepatobiliary repair following cholestatic liver injury in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.
2
Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.
3
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.
4
Department of Computational and Systems Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH.
6
Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.
7
Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA. knnst5@pitt.edu.

Abstract

Hepatic repair is directed chiefly by the proliferation of resident mature epithelial cells. Furthermore, if predominant injury is to cholangiocytes, the hepatocytes can transdifferentiate to cholangiocytes to assist in the repair and vice versa, as shown by various fate-tracing studies. However, the molecular bases of reprogramming remain elusive. Using two models of biliary injury where repair occurs through cholangiocyte proliferation and hepatocyte transdifferentiation to cholangiocytes, we identify an important role of Wnt signaling. First we identify up-regulation of specific Wnt proteins in the cholangiocytes. Next, using conditional knockouts of Wntless and Wnt coreceptors low-density lipoprotein-related protein 5/6, transgenic mice expressing stable β-catenin, and in vitro studies, we show a role of Wnt signaling through β-catenin in hepatocyte to biliary transdifferentiation. Last, we show that specific Wnts regulate cholangiocyte proliferation, but in a β-catenin-independent manner.

CONCLUSION:

Wnt signaling regulates hepatobiliary repair after cholestatic injury in both β-catenin-dependent and -independent manners. (Hepatology 2016;64:1652-1666).

PMID:
27533619
PMCID:
PMC5074849
DOI:
10.1002/hep.28774
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center