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Cytokine. 2018 Jan;101:14-18. doi: 10.1016/j.cyto.2016.08.003. Epub 2016 Aug 13.

TNF activity and T cells.

Author information

1
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, Division of Immune Regulation, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA 92037, United States.
2
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, Division of Immune Regulation, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA 92037, United States. Electronic address: mick@lji.org.

Abstract

TNF (tumor necrosis factor) is both a pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine that is central to the development of autoimmune disease, cancer, and protection against infectious pathogens. As well as a myriad other activities, TNF can be a product of T cells and can act on T cells. Here we review old and new data on the importance of TNF produced by T cells and how TNF signaling via TNFR2 may directly impact alternate aspects of T cell biology. TNF can promote the activation and proliferation of naïve and effector T cells, but also can induce apoptosis of highly activated effector T cells, further determining the size of the pathogenic or protective conventional T cell pool. Moreover, TNF can have divergent effects on regulatory T cells. It can both downregulate their suppressive capacity, but also contribute in other instances to their development or accumulation. Biologics that block TNF or stimulate TNFR2 therefore have the potential to strongly modulate the balance between effector T cells and Treg cells which could impact disease in both positive and negative manners.

KEYWORDS:

T cells; TNF; TNFR1; TNFR2; Treg

PMID:
27531077
PMCID:
PMC5305780
DOI:
10.1016/j.cyto.2016.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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