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Telemed J E Health. 2017 Feb;23(2):80-87. doi: 10.1089/tmj.2016.0060. Epub 2016 Aug 16.

Patient Satisfaction with In-Home Telerehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
1 Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval , Québec, Canada .
2
2 Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation and Social Integration (CIRRIS), Quebec Rehabilitation Institute , Québec, Canada .
3
3 School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke and Research Centre on Aging , Sherbrooke, Canada .
4
4 School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal and Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal , Montréal, Canada .
5
5 Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval and Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en santé mentale , Québec, Canada .
6
6 Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke and Research Centre on Aging , Sherbrooke, Canada .
7
7 University Hospital of Québec City (CHU-Q) , Québec, Canada .
8
8 Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke and University Hospital of Sherbrooke (CHUS) , Sherbrooke, Canada .
9
9 Hôpital Jean-Talon , Montréal, Canada .
10
10 St. Mary's Hospital Center , Montreal, Canada .

Abstract

Background and Introduction: Telerehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is supported by strong evidence on the effectiveness of such intervention and from a cost-benefit point of view. Satisfaction of patients toward in-home telerehabilitation after TKA has not yet been examined thoroughly in large-scale clinical trials. This study aims to compare satisfaction level of patients following in-home telerehabilitation (TELE) after TKA to one of the patients following a usual face-to-face home visit (STD) rehabilitation. Secondarily, to determine if any clinical or personal variables were associated to the level of satisfaction.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This study was embedded in a multicenter randomized controlled trial with 205 patients randomized into two groups. Rehabilitation intervention was the same for both groups; only approach for service delivery differed (telerehabilitation or home visits). Participants were assessed at baseline (before TKA), at hospital discharge, and at 2 and 4 months postdischarge (E4) using functional outcomes. Patient satisfaction was measured using the validated Health Care Satisfaction Questionnaire (HCSQ) at E4.

RESULTS:

Characteristics of all participants were similar at baseline. Satisfaction level of both groups did not differ and was very high (over 85%). It was neither correlated to personal characteristics nor to improvements of functional level from preoperative to E4. Satisfaction was rather found associated to walking and stair-climbing performances.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results, in conjunction with evidences of clinical effectiveness and cost benefits demonstrated in the same sample of patients, strongly support the use of telerehabilitation to improve access to rehabilitation services and efficiency of service delivery after TKA.

KEYWORDS:

e-health; rehabilitation; technology; telehealth

PMID:
27529575
DOI:
10.1089/tmj.2016.0060
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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