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PLoS One. 2016 Aug 16;11(8):e0161250. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0161250. eCollection 2016.

Effects of Renal Denervation Documented in the Austrian National Multicentre Renal Denervation Registry.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria.
2
Department of Internal Medicine I, Kepler University Hospital, Linz, Austria.
3
Department of Internal Medicine II, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.
4
Department of Internal Medicine II, Klinikum Wels-Grieskirchen, Wels, Austria.
5
Department of Internal Medicine III, Medizinische Universität Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
6
Department of Internal Medicine IV, Medizinische Universität Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
7
Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine III, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
8
Department of Internal Medicine II, Krankenhaus der Elisabethinen Linz, Linz, Austria.
9
Department of Internal Medicine, Landeskrankenhaus Waidhofen an der Ybbs, Waidhofen/Ybbs, Austria.
10
Third Department of Internal Medicine, Wilhelminenspital and Medical Faculty, Sigmund Freud University, Vienna, Austria.
11
Medical Faculty, Sigmund Freud University, Vienna, Austria.
12
Department of Internal Medicine I, Krankenhaus St. Josef Braunau, Braunau, Austria.
13
Fifth Medical Department, Kaiser-Franz-Josef-Spital, Vienna, Austria.
14
Department of Internal Medicine, Privatklinik Mariahilf, Klagenfurt, Austria.
15
Department of Internal Medicine, Krankenhaus St. Vinzenz, Zams, Austria.
16
Department of Internal Medicine II, Landesklinikum Wiener Neustadt, Wiener Neustadt, Austria.

Abstract

Renal denervation (RDN) is a new procedure for treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. In order to monitor all procedures undergone in Austria, the Austrian Society of Hypertension established the investigator-initiated Austrian Transcatheter Renal Denervation (TREND) Registry. From April 2011 to September 2014, 407 procedures in 14 Austrian centres were recorded. At baseline, office and mean 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) were 171/94 and 151/89 mmHg, respectively, and patients were taking a median of 4 antihypertensive medications. Mean 24-h ABP changes after 2-6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months were -11/-6, -8/-4, -8/-5 and -10/-6 mmHg (p<0.05 at all measurements), respectively. The periprocedural complication rate was 2.5%. Incidence of long-term complications during follow-up (median 1 year) was 0.5%. Office BP and ABP responses showed only a weak correlation (Pearson coefficient 0.303). Based on the data from the TREND registry, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in addition to office BP should be used for patient selection as well as for monitoring response to RDN. Furthermore, criteria for optimal patient selection are suggested.

PMID:
27529426
PMCID:
PMC4987037
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0161250
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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