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Chemosphere. 2016 Nov;163:209-216. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.08.027. Epub 2016 Aug 16.

Effects of water quality on inactivation and repair of Microcystis viridis and Tetraselmis suecica following medium-pressure UV irradiation.

Author information

1
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576, Singapore; School of Environment and Energy, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055, China.
2
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576, Singapore.
3
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576, Singapore. Electronic address: ceehujy@nus.edu.sg.

Abstract

The transfer of invasive organisms by ballast-water discharge has become a growing concern. UV treatment has become an attractive ballast water treatment technology due to its effectiveness, no harmful disinfection byproducts and easiness to handle. Two robust algae strains Microcystis viridis and Tetraselmis suecica were selected as indicator organisms to determine efficiency of medium-pressure (MP) UV-treatment on ballast water. Inactivation and potential repair of these two algae strains following MP UV irradiation were assessed under various turbidity, total organic carbon (TOC) and salinity conditions. The investigated range of UV doses was from 25 to 500 mJ/cm(2). For M. viridis, results indicated that disinfection efficiency was negatively correlated with all of these three factors at low doses (25-200 mJ/cm(2)). Photoreactivation and dark repair were promoted at high TOC levels (6-15 mg/L) with about 6-25% higher repair levels compared with those in distilled water, whereas no significant impacts were identified for turbidity and salinity on both of the photoreactivation and dark repair. For T. suecica, increased turbidity and TOC levels both hindered the performance of UV irradiation at high doses (200-500 mJ/cm(2)). Suppressive effects on photoreactivation and dark repair were consistently observed with changes of all of the three factors. In conclusion, generally these three factors resulted in repressive effects on UV disinfection efficiency, and TOC played a more significant role in the levels of reactivation than the other two. The responses of T. suecica to these three factors were more sensitive than M. viridis.

KEYWORDS:

Ballast water; Dark repair; Medium-pressure UV disinfection; Microcystis viridis; Photoreactivation; Tetraselmis suecica

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