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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016 Nov - Dec;48(10):716-722.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2016.07.001. Epub 2016 Aug 12.

Supporting Families to Cook at Home and Eat Together: Findings From a Feasibility Study.

Author information

1
School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. Electronic address: J.utter@auckland.ac.nz.
2
Department of Paediatrics, Child and Youth Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The current study tested the feasibility and acceptability of an intervention that provided families with meal plans, recipes, and ingredients to cook meals at home.

METHODS:

Ten diverse families (1 adolescent, 1 parent) were provided with the resources to prepare 5 family dinners/wk for 8 weeks. Process data were collected by weekly telephone calls. Outcome data were collected by open-ended interviews with parent or caregiver and adolescents, separately.

RESULTS:

Most of the meals provided were prepared (86%) and a high proportion of meals prepared were eaten together by families (96%). Both parents and adolescents reported that the intervention was acceptable, particularly the opportunity to try new foods. Families reported multiple benefits to participation, including eating healthier, feeling better, and having improved relationships.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Providing families with resources for home cooking appears to be an acceptable and well-enjoyed intervention. Further research measuring the health and social impacts of this intervention is warranted.

KEYWORDS:

adolescent; dinner kit; family meal; nutrition; parent

PMID:
27527909
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneb.2016.07.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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