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Spinal Cord. 2017 Mar;55(3):235-243. doi: 10.1038/sc.2016.126. Epub 2016 Aug 16.

Associations with being physically active and the achievement of WHO recommendations on physical activity in people with spinal cord injury.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology-IBE, Chair for Public Health and Health Services Research, Research Unit for Biopsychosocial Health, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, Germany.
2
Division of Sports and Exercise Medicine, Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
3
Swiss Paraplegic Research, Nottwil, Switzerland.
4
Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, School of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Secondary data analysis from the cross-sectional survey of the Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Cohort Study.

OBJECTIVES:

To explore associations with physical activity (PA) levels in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) with the specific aim to identify aspects that potentially explain being physically active (PHYS-ACT) and the achievement of the World Health Organization recommendations on PA.

SETTING:

Community sample (n=485).

METHODS:

Participants who completely answered four items of the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities were included. Two outcome measures were defined: (1) being PHYS-ACT vs being completely inactive and (2) achieving WHO recommendations on PA (ACH-WHO-REC) (at least 2.5 h per week of at least moderate intensity) vs performing less. Independent variables were selected from the original questionnaire by applying the ICF framework. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted.

RESULTS:

In the participants (aged 52.8±14.8; 73.6% male) older age decreased, but being a manual wheelchair user increased the odds of achieving both outcomes. Social support and self-efficacy increased the odds of being PHYS-ACT. Use of an intermittent catheter increased, whereas dependency in self-care mobility and coping with emotions decreased the odds for ACH-WHO-REC. Experiencing hindrances due to accessibility is associated with increased odds for ACH-WHO-REC.

CONCLUSION:

Being PHYS-ACT at all and achieving the WHO recommendations on PA are associated with different aspects. Applying the ICF framework contributes to a comprehensive understanding of PA behavior in people with SCI, which can tailor the development of interventions. Longitudinal studies should be initiated to test these associations for causal relationships.

PMID:
27527238
DOI:
10.1038/sc.2016.126
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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