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Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2016 Aug;11(4):552-63.

REHABILITATION OF SUBACROMIAL PAIN SYNDROME EMPHASIZING SCAPULAR DYSKINESIS IN AMATEUR ATHLETES: A CASE SERIES.

Author information

1
Physical Therapy Sector, Santa Casa of São Paulo - ISCMSP, São Paulo-SP, Brazil.
2
Nove de Julho University, São Paulo-SP, Brazil.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Case series.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Scapular dyskinesis has been associated with several shoulder injuries. Recent literature has suggested that a greater activation of the scapular muscles can play an important role in reducing subacromial impingement in patients with shoulder pain. Thus, the purpose of this case series was to describe a rehabilitation program that emphasizes scapular dyskinesis correction for those with clinical evidence of subacromial pain syndrome.

CASE DESCRIPTIONS:

The four amateur athletes in this series showed clinical evidence of subacromial pain syndrome and scapular dyskinesis and each underwent a treatment protocol consisting of three phases. Phase 1 emphasized pain relief, scapular control, and recovery of normal range of motion (ROM), Phase 2 focused on muscular strengthening, and Phase 3 emphasized sensory motor training.

OUTCOMES:

All subjects demonstrated decreased pain, improved sports performance and function, increased muscular strength for shoulder elevation and external rotation, and increased ROM for internal rotation. Improvement in serratus anterior (SA) activation was also noted.

DISCUSSION:

The results of this case series suggest that subjects with clinical tests positive for subacromial pain syndrome can show significant improvement with an intervention focused on scapular dyskinesis correction. SA activation can play an important role in this process given that all subjects presented with better recruitment after rehabilitation, as measured by electromyography.

LEVELS OF EVIDENCE:

Level 4.

KEYWORDS:

Impingement; serratus anterior; trapezius

PMID:
27525180
PMCID:
PMC4970846

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