Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2017 Jan;61:3-11. doi: 10.1016/j.semcdb.2016.08.006. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

Tissue-specific contribution of macrophages to wound healing.

Author information

1
Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution, and the Institute for Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3FL, United Kingdom.
2
School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine & Health & Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, United Kingdom. Electronic address: judi.allen@manchester.ac.uk.
3
Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution, and the Institute for Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3FL, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Dietmar.Zaiss@ed.ac.uk.

Abstract

Macrophages are present in all tissues, either as resident cells or monocyte-derived cells that infiltrate into tissues. The tissue site largely determines the phenotype of tissue-resident cells, which help to maintain tissue homeostasis and act as sentinels of injury. Both tissue resident and recruited macrophages make a substantial contribution to wound healing following injury. In this review, we evaluate how macrophages in two fundamentally distinct tissues, i.e. the lung and the skin, differentially contribute to the process of wound healing. We highlight the commonalities of macrophage functions during repair and contrast them with distinct, tissue-specific functions that macrophages fulfill during the different stages of wound healing.

KEYWORDS:

Extra-cellular matrix; Inflammation; Lung; Macrophage; Skin; Tissue repair

PMID:
27521521
DOI:
10.1016/j.semcdb.2016.08.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center