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Asian J Psychiatr. 2016 Aug;22:69-73. doi: 10.1016/j.ajp.2016.04.005. Epub 2016 May 10.

A study of phenomenology, psychiatric co-morbidities, social and adaptive functioning in children and adolescents with OCD.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Rohilkhand Medical College and Hospitals, Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh, India.
3
Department of Psychiatry, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India. Electronic address: amitarya.11kgmu@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the phenomenology, social, adaptive and global functioning of children and adolescents with OCD.

BACKGROUND:

Studies have shown varying prevalence of paediatric OCD ranging from 1% to 4%. Childhood-onset OCD have some important differences in sex distribution, presentation, co-morbidities and insight.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

25 subjects (6 to ≤18 years) with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of OCD were included in this study. Subjects were evaluated using K-SADS-PL, Children's Y-BOCS, HoNOSCA, C-GAS and VABS-II.

RESULTS:

The mean age of the sample was 14.9±2.2 years. Obsession of contamination was commonest (68%) followed by aggressive obsession (60%); commonest compulsions were washing and cleaning (72%) followed by checking (56%). Most distressing obsessions were obsession of doubt about their decision (28%), having horrible thoughts about their family being hurt (20%) and thought that something terrible is going to happen and it will be their fault (16%). Most subjects rate spending far too much time in washing hands (60%) as most distressing compulsion, followed by rewriting and checking compulsions (both 12%). 76% subjects have co-morbid psychiatric diagnosis. Anxiety disorders (24%), depression (16%), and dissociative disorder (16%) were common co-morbidities. Mean C-GAS score of the sample was 53.2±9.9. 44% of subjects had below average adaptive functioning.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study shows that, most frequent obsessions and compulsions may be different from most distressing ones and this finding might have clinical implication. Most of the children and adolescent with OCD have co-morbidities. Children also had problems in adaptive functioning.

KEYWORDS:

Children and adolescent; OCD; Phenomenology; Psychiatric co-morbidity; Social and adaptive functioning

PMID:
27520897
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajp.2016.04.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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