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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Aug 9;13(8). pii: E804. doi: 10.3390/ijerph13080804.

Working with Climate Projections to Estimate Disease Burden: Perspectives from Public Health.

Author information

1
Climate and Health Program, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. kconlon@cdc.gov.
2
Florida Department of Health, Tallahassee, FL 32399, USA. Kristina.Kintziger@FLHealth.gov.
3
Oregon Public Health Authority, Portland, OR 97232, USA. Meredith.A.Jagger@state.or.us.
4
Center for Ocean Atmosphere Prediction Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2741, USA. lstefanova@fsu.edu.
5
Climate and Health Program, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. cuejio@fsu.edu.
6
Department of Geography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2190, USA. cuejio@fsu.edu.
7
Department of Geography, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3220, USA. konrad@unc.edu.

Abstract

There is interest among agencies and public health practitioners in the United States (USA) to estimate the future burden of climate-related health outcomes. Calculating disease burden projections can be especially daunting, given the complexities of climate modeling and the multiple pathways by which climate influences public health. Interdisciplinary coordination between public health practitioners and climate scientists is necessary for scientifically derived estimates. We describe a unique partnership of state and regional climate scientists and public health practitioners assembled by the Florida Building Resilience Against Climate Effects (BRACE) program. We provide a background on climate modeling and projections that has been developed specifically for public health practitioners, describe methodologies for combining climate and health data to project disease burden, and demonstrate three examples of this process used in Florida.

KEYWORDS:

adaptation; attributable fraction; climate modeling; project disease burden; public health

PMID:
27517942
PMCID:
PMC4997490
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph13080804
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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