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Epilepsy Behav. 2016 Sep;62:267-75. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2016.07.007. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

Randomized double-blind comparison of cognitive and EEG effects of lacosamide and carbamazepine.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Electronic address: kmeador@stanford.edu.
2
Department of Neurology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: dloring@emory.edu.
3
CNS Vital Signs, Morrisville, NC, USA. Electronic address: aboyd@cnsvs.com.
4
JE Research, Inc., Alpharetta, GA, USA. Electronic address: echauz@ieee.org.
5
Department of Neurology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: Suzette.LaRoche@msj.org.
6
Department of Neurology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: nxv146@med.miami.edu.
7
Department of Neurology, University of Colorado, Denver, CO, USA. Electronic address: pearce.korb@ucdenver.edu.
8
UCB Pharma, Raleigh, NC, USA. Electronic address: Bill.Byrnes@ucb.com.
9
UCB Pharma, Raleigh, NC, USA. Electronic address: Deanne.Dilley@ucb.com.
10
UCB Pharma, Slough, UK. Electronic address: Simon.Borghs@ucb.com.
11
UCB Pharma, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: Marc.DeBacker@ucb.com.
12
UCB Pharma, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: TylerJStory@gmail.com.
13
UCB Pharma, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: Peter.Dedeken@ucb.com.
14
UCB Pharma, Raleigh, NC, USA. Electronic address: Elizabeth.Webster@ucb.com.

Abstract

Differential effectiveness of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is more commonly determined by tolerability than efficacy. Cognitive effects of AEDs can adversely affect tolerability and quality of life. This study evaluated cognitive and EEG effects of lacosamide (LCM) compared with carbamazepine immediate-release (CBZ-IR). A randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, two-period crossover, fixed-dose study in healthy subjects compared neuropsychological and EEG effects of LCM (150mg, b.i.d.) and CBZ-IR (200mg, t.i.d.). Testing was conducted at screening, predrug baseline, the end of each treatment period (3-week titration; 3-week maintenance), and the end of each washout period (4weeks after treatment). A composite Z-score was derived for the primary outcome variable (computerized cognitive tests and traditional neuropsychological measures) and separately for the EEG measures. Other variables included individual computer, neuropsychological, and EEG scores and adverse events (AEs). Subjects included 60 healthy adults (57% female; mean age: 34.4years [SD: 10.5]); 44 completed both treatments; 41 were per protocol subjects. Carbamazepine immediate-release had worse scores compared with LCM for the primary composite neuropsychological outcome (mean difference=0.33 [SD: 1.36], p=0.011) and for the composite EEG score (mean difference=0.92 [SD: 1.77], p=0.003). Secondary analyses across the individual variables revealed that CBZ-IR was statistically worse than LCM on 36% (4/11) of the neuropsychological tests (computerized and noncomputerized) and 0% of the four EEG measures; none favored CBZ-IR. Drug-related AEs occurred more with CBZ-IR (49%) than LCM (22%). Lacosamide had fewer untoward neuropsychological and EEG effects and fewer AEs and AE-related discontinuations than CBZ-IR in healthy subjects. Lacosamide exhibits a favorable cognitive profile.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01530022.

KEYWORDS:

Carbamazepine; Cognition; EEG; Lacosamide; Neuropsychology

PMID:
27517350
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2016.07.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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