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Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Oct;26(10):937-43. doi: 10.1016/j.numecd.2016.07.010. Epub 2016 Jul 21.

Dietary fat intake modifies the influence of the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism on adiposity in adolescents: The HELENA cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Vitoria, Spain; Nutrition, Exercise and Health Research Group, Elikadura, Ariketa Fisikoa eta Osasuna, ELIKOS Group, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain. Electronic address: idoia.labayen@ehu.es.
2
Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
3
Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; International Agency for Research on Cancer, Dietary Exposure Assessment Group, Lyon, France.
4
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Vitoria, Spain; Nutrition, Exercise and Health Research Group, Elikadura, Ariketa Fisikoa eta Osasuna, ELIKOS Group, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain.
5
Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences (INEF), Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
6
Division of Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
7
Department of Pediatrics, University of Pecs, Pécs, Hungary.
8
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
9
Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
10
INSERM U1167, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Université Lille Nord de France, France.
11
GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

The fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) has been associated with obesity and dietary intake. The aims were: (i) To assess whether energy and macronutrient intakes were different across the FTOrs9939609 genotypes in adolescents, and (ii) to explore whether dietary fat intake modified the association of the rs9939609 polymorphism with adiposity.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

The FTOrs9939609 polymorphism was genotyped in 652 adolescents (53% females, 14.8 ± 1.2 years, TT = 246, TA = 296, AA = 110). Energy and macronutrient intake were assessed by two non-consecutive 24 h-recalls. Weight, height, waist circumference and skinfold thicknesses were measured and body fat percent was calculated. Energy and macronutrient intake were similar across the FTOrs9939609 genotypes (P > 0.2). There were significant interactions between the FTO polymorphism and fat intake on adiposity estimates (P < 0.05). In adolescents whose fat intake was below 30% (N = 203), the A allele of rs9939609 was not associated with adiposity indices. In contrast, in adolescents whose fat intake was between 30% and 35% of energy (N = 190), the rs9939609 polymorphism was associated with a 1.9% higher body fat per risk allele (95%CI: 0.39, 3.33; P < 0.05), and in those whose fat intake was higher than 35% (N = 259), it was associated with a 2.8% higher body fat per risk allele (95%CI: 1.27, 4.43; P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings support the concept that the deleterious effect of the FTOrs9939609 polymorphism on adiposity is exacerbated in adolescents consuming high fat diets. In contrast, the consumption of low fat diets (<30% of energy) may attenuate the genetic predisposition to obesity in risk allele carriers.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Diet composition; FTO gene; Fat intake; Obesity

PMID:
27514607
DOI:
10.1016/j.numecd.2016.07.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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