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Br Dent J. 2016 Aug 12;221(3):112-4. doi: 10.1038/sj.bdj.2016.554.

A change in the NICE guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis.

Author information

1
Professor of Translational Research in Dentistry, The School of Clinical Dentistry, University of Sheffield, Adjunct Professor of Oral Medicine, Department of Oral Medicine, Carolinas Medical Centre, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA.
2
Consultant Cardiologist, Taunton and Somerset NHS Trust.
3
Research Professor, Department of Oral Medicine, Carolinas Medical Centre, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA.
4
Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
5
Consultant Cardiologist.
6
Consultant Cardiologist and Professor of Clinical Cardiology, Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals, London.
7
Honourary Consultant Microbiologist at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London.

Abstract

Since 2008, NICE clinical guidelines have stated: 'Antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis is not recommended for people undergoing dental procedures'. This put UK guidance at odds with guidance in the rest of the world, where antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for patients at high-risk of infective endocarditis undergoing invasive dental procedures. Many dentists also felt this wording prohibited the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, regardless of the wishes of the patient or their personal risk of infective endocarditis and made it difficult for them to use their clinical judgment to deliver individualised care in the best interests of their patients. NICE have now changed this guidance to 'Antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis is not recommended routinely for people undergoing dental procedures.' This article examines the implications of this small but important change.

PMID:
27514339
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bdj.2016.554
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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