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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Aug 23;113(34):9653-8. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1523980113. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

Spontaneous eyelid closures link vigilance fluctuation with fMRI dynamic connectivity states.

Author information

1
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, Duke-National University of Singapore Medical School, National University of Singapore, 169857 Singapore;
2
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, Duke-National University of Singapore Medical School, National University of Singapore, 169857 Singapore; Clinical Imaging Research Centre, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), National University of Singapore, 117599 Singapore.
3
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, Duke-National University of Singapore Medical School, National University of Singapore, 169857 Singapore; michael.chee@duke-nus.edu.sg.

Abstract

Fluctuations in resting-state functional connectivity occur but their behavioral significance remains unclear, largely because correlating behavioral state with dynamic functional connectivity states (DCS) engages probes that disrupt the very behavioral state we seek to observe. Observing spontaneous eyelid closures following sleep deprivation permits nonintrusive arousal monitoring. During periods of low arousal dominated by eyelid closures, sliding-window correlation analysis uncovered a DCS associated with reduced within-network functional connectivity of default mode and dorsal/ventral attention networks, as well as reduced anticorrelation between these networks. Conversely, during periods when participants' eyelids were wide open, a second DCS was associated with less decoupling between the visual network and higher-order cognitive networks that included dorsal/ventral attention and default mode networks. In subcortical structures, eyelid closures were associated with increased connectivity between the striatum and thalamus with the ventral attention network, and greater anticorrelation with the dorsal attention network. When applied to task-based fMRI data, these two DCS predicted interindividual differences in frequency of behavioral lapsing and intraindividual temporal fluctuations in response speed. These findings with participants who underwent a night of total sleep deprivation were replicated in an independent dataset involving partially sleep-deprived participants. Fluctuations in functional connectivity thus appear to be clearly associated with changes in arousal.

KEYWORDS:

dynamic connectivity states; eyelid closure; resting-state fMRI; sleep deprivation; vigilance

PMID:
27512040
PMCID:
PMC5003283
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1523980113
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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