Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Oral Investig. 2017 Mar;21(2):597-605. doi: 10.1007/s00784-016-1926-9. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

Prevalence of otologic signs and symptoms in adult patients with temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Speech-language Pathology and Audiology, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Vidal Ramos Street, number 110, apto 903, Downtown, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. pt.isabela@gmail.com.
2
Department of Speech-language Pathology and Audiology, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Vidal Ramos Street, number 110, apto 903, Downtown, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
3
Brazilian Centre for Evidence-Based Research, Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil.
4
Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil.
5
Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health, School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.
6
School of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aims to estimate the prevalence of otologic signs and symptoms in adult patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD).

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Search strategies were developed for each of the following databases: PubMed, LILACS, Scopus, Web of Science, Proquest, LIVIVO, and Google Scholar and OpenGrey was used to assess the grey literature. It was included in this review only observational studies using either research diagnostic criteria (RDC)/TMD or DC/TMD indexes were selected. The Critical Appraisal Checklist for Studies Reporting Prevalence Data from the Joanna Briggs Institute was used to assess the risk of bias of the included studies. A proportion random effects meta-analysis was conducted within the eight included studies.

RESULTS:

Eight studies met the eligibility criteria and were selected. All of the included studies used the RDC/TMD and report associated otologic signs and symptoms. The studies were clustered into groups based on prevalence for each individual sign or symptom. The most prevalent otologic symptom associated with TMD was ear fullness (74.8 % standard deviation (SD), 43.02 to 96.25 %; n = 50), followed by otalgia (55.1 % SD, 31.78 to 77.30; n = 386), tinnitus (52.1 % SD, 38.43 to 65.74; n = 1293), vertigo (40.8 % SD, 11.29 to 74.72; n = 374), and hearing loss (38.9 % SD, 2.83 to 85.46; n = 744).

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence of otologic signs and symptoms in adult patients with TMD is high. The most prevalent otologic symptom in patient adults with TMD is ear fullness.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

This study intends to provide understanding over the prevalence of otologic signs and symptoms in TMD cases in adults.

KEYWORDS:

Meta-analysis; Otologic signs and symptoms; Prevalence; Review; Temporomandibular disorders

PMID:
27511214
DOI:
10.1007/s00784-016-1926-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center